Opportunity Seized

About three years ago, dreams of travel to lands far away began to flood my mind as I listened to my future wife talk of her time abroad. I had a few ideas in mind, namely a visit to the land(s) of my heritage – I am a standard American-European mutt afterall. As dreams from the depths of my mind came to surface during long night’s sleep, other visions slowly became more clear. Eventually, the persistence of planning and the saving of money paid off and we were in fact able to set in stone an itinerary which would see us travel the world.

The beautiful game, A.K.A. soccer, is something that holds a special place in my heart. I played my first game as a youngster with my Dad as Coach. Since the age of five, the game has been a continued interest of mine. While continuing to dream of our travel, I felt as though I could not miss an opportunity to see the game played on the biggest stage so that I might experience the passion shared by the world over. Luckily enough, I was able to find a competition in the famed Champions League, an annually held tournament of the top teams throughout Europe, occuring during the calendar months we had planned to travel.

Of nearly equal passion to the sport of soccer, anything with wheels and an engine have always stirred my soul. In fact, some years ago a good friend of mine and I went so far as to purchase and begin making modifications to a late model Japanese car we had planned to race in the Hertz Hornets league near Marysville, Washington state. Our vision failed utterly and sadly we never competed. Thankfully, we are still good friends to this day as this pie-in-the-sky plan didn’t quite pan out and we ended up junking the car. I digress.

Naturally, very near the top of my list of desired destinations was Italy given their passion for both automobili and futbol. Morever, Tarin had never stopped talking about her love of the country – the food, wine, and people, not to mention the beauty of the architecture and land. Perfect, let’s add this destination to our list, I thought. The day-to-day itinerary would most certainly consist of food, wine and the typical sightseeing. The Vatican, the myriad museums and hopefully some of the countryside were to be included. An absolute for me was a visit to the land of Enzo Ferrari, the creator of the artistic and engineering magnificence bearing his last name. The sight and sound of these creations evoked such curiosity that I actually wrote a paper on Enzo in my very short lived college life. Surely I would have to visit the museum and perhaps I might have the opportunity to sit behind the wheel of one of these simply sublime creations.

Enter Rome, a massive city wrought with history, filled with people and the everpresent stench of cigarettes. We had planned a fairly typical trip including the aforementioned Vatican but I was most excited for an opportunity to see a Champions League game played between Serie A (top professional soccer league in Italy) team Roma and Bundesliga (Germany’s top professional soccer league) giant Bayer Leverkusen. The game was to be played at the famed Stadio Olimpico, home to the world’s first Olympiad. We arrived early to find a stadium of rather modern appearance, which was a bit surprising. True, these were the same grounds once used to showcase the very first Olympic games, but I had expected a much, much older building. My initial disappointment at the grounds quickly faded as the fans filtered in and the Roma team song began. None of the seats were used as every single Roma fan stood and proudly held their team’s scarf high whilst belting out the lyrics. The passion was palpable and I was instantly glued to the pitch and the players. The game’s first goal came at the two minute mark from a breakneck Roma counterattack via a throughball to the dynamic midfielder Mohammed Salah – he slotted the ball past the outstretched appendages of the Leverkusen keeper and the stadium simply erupted. Mind you, I’ve not been a lifelong fan of Roma but I, along with the true fans, exploded in a fit of cheers, so much so that I nearly lost my voice for the remainder of the match. The game ended with a Roma win as a result of a penalty kick awarded in the closing minutes of the match.

I was happy the team walked away with the win as I don’t think the Roma fans would be terribly happy, or civil, without!

Fast forward to our final day in Italy, spent in the northern regions of Modena and Maranello, land of the automobile for Italy. Of particular importance for me was a visit to the two Ferrari museums. The first museum we visited detailed the life of Enzo and his love of the automobile. I am certainly no expert of museums, but Tarin and I both agreed that this was a very well executed exhibit which included physical representations of his life’s work in the form of some of the most infamous models of Ferraris as well as an immersive audio/video presentation completed by a total of 19 video projectors and a surround sound system. The visuals of Enzo’s childhood and his prolific racing career were accompanied by the operatic sounds of Luciano Pavarotti, the world famous Modena-born tenor; Enzo and Luciano shared a friendship and admiration for one another in their adulthood as they were both hailed as the best of their craft and also grew up in the same region. This production playing out amongst the presence of the most beautiful cars to grace this earth moved me immensely, and left a feeling as though I had visited a world-class museum.

Enzo Ferrari Museo. The car in the foreground is the 1984 Testarossa - the one that started my fascination.
Enzo Ferrari Museo. The car in the foreground is the 1984 Testarossa – the one that started my fascination.

We then made our way to Maranello, home of the Ferrari factory and the official F1 Ferrari museum where I was delighted to find several third-party companies offering the chance to drive one of these works of art. I snapped up the chance and hopped behind the wheel of a 2009 Ferrari California, the “Family Car” produced by the Maranello-based design house. The experience didn’t disappoint and I had a couple of opportunities to open up the engine, even passing a slow-going sedan in the vineyard covered hills of Northern Italy. All the while, I had my best friend and wife in the back seat to enjoy this once in a lifetime experience.

Behind the Wheel of the 2009 Ferrari California
Behind the Wheel of the 2009 Ferrari California

Throughout my time in Italy, I often thought of my Uncle Joe who had recently been battling cancer. He underwent a significant surgery to remove the cancer earlier this year and was healthy enough to attend my wedding, which was very special for me as he was one of two uncles who was always present in my life. Unfortunately, after the intense surgery and recovery to remove the cancer, he fell out of remission and passed away just a few days ago. He had recently retired from a physically demanding and long tenured career and I can only imagine that he had plans to live out some dreams of his own. On two occasions in as many weeks, I had a chance to live out dreams of mine. I am incredibly thankful for the opportunity to do so and if not for my own personal enjoyment, I also lived these moments in remembrance and in honor of my family and my Uncle Joe. These experiences only solidified the need to truly live in the moment and take the opportunities life affords oneself.

And the Winner is…

As we round out our time in the Country of Tanzania, we have a lot to reflect on. We have spent more than three weeks in the so-called ‘third world’. It has certainly had an effect on us. It is evident that there is a lot to be done for equal opportunity and a truly democratic society to thrive. We realize that access to education and services like electricity, running water and even garbage removal which we take for granted are reserved for the privileged. More concerning, a fair voting process has yet to cemented.

We landed in Moshi, Tanzania three days before the presidential election – quite ironic given that we were looking forward to escaping attention on the political front during our travels. We were amongst very passionate people in an area buzzing with energy. Our guides were thrilled to be able to participate in the voting. They pined to stand in queue to mark their vote and their place in history. Our Safari guide took any chance he could to talk to other locals throughout our adventure to discuss who was in the lead. He had an absolutely infectious energy about him as he kept us abreast.

We left for our Safari on the day the vote took place. All throughout our drive to Terengire National Park we saw heaps of queues along the streets of each small town we passed through. Mind you, people had to wait in line in their ‘district’ to cast their vote. There are no absentee ballots here in Tanzania and most people don’t have a car. For most, this election day was a monumental task to organize their personal schedules to ensure they could participate. This was the first time in their near-50 year independence from Britain that another party was running against the ruling party. It was thrilling to witness the passion to not only vote but also the opportunity to represent their party affiliation; driving through the countryside, every other house was flying their flags of allegiance – either CCM, the ruling party, or the opposition, led by candidate Edward Lowassa. Most flags we saw near the towns of Moshi and Arusha were for the opposition: a blue and white flag with the hand showing the universal peace sign. As we drove down the road, kids, adults, almost everyone was all smiles while holding up their piece sign proudly. This was the signal of unity during our visit. It was exhilarating being witness to such an important time in their history. We couldn’t help but feel as though the opposition was going to win with all the support witnessed. It was clear that the opposition had a significant backing by the people of Tanzania – so we thought.

During the drive, our safari guide Mosses made us aware of the power which the ruling party exercised. We learned that the ruling party has been in power for the last 50 years with only three separate presidents. Mosses was very knowledgeable and provided a historical background during our drive through the many towns and villages. During the late 70’s, he spent over a year living in a cave with his family in order to protect themselves from shelling stemming from the territorial wars with Uganda. A harrowing tale that sent shivers down our backs. In speaking of the historic election day, he told us of impending conflict which he and many others anticipated; in the weeks leading up to the election, many boxes of fake votes for the ruling party were found in possession by election officials for said party. We started to realize how easily this symbolic day might simply slip away for so many hopeful Tanzanians. Nonetheless, hope remained on the faces and in the voices of many people we interacted with along the way.

As we finished our final day on safari, we asked Mosses if there was any news to share about the election. Clearly distraught, he told us that ruling party was slated to win. Indeed, it appeared as though the ruling party had rigged the election by use of the aforementioned fake votes. He did, however, mention that the ruling party had lost Zanzibar island to the opposition, but that this, of course, was heavily disputed. His final words about the election were extremely disheartening – he was never going to cast a vote again in light of this blatant corruption. As foreigners, from a democratic country, it was unfathomable that this could happen! This was the first time Mosses had ever voted and hearing that he may never cast a vote again, we realized that we couldn’t offer any helpful words. We decided not to broach the subject for the rest of the trip.

We were on Zanzibar Island for five nights and spent one day in the city of Stone Town. We noticed that we couldn’t see anything but the ruling parties’ flags throughout, which seemed quite odd given what Mosses had mentioned earlier. We were essentially in a European-centric resort with not many people around to discuss the election, which was just fine by us given the ferocity the subject demanded from Tanzanians. As we read a NY Times article trying to find out who did in fact win, we confirmed that the ruling party had yet to concede. The opposition party is fervently demanding a recount as they believe the election was rigged.

The ruling party has stated that they will hold a new election for Zanzibar in three months time but no official word regarding the country at large. In other, very disappointing words, to be continued for the people and country of Tanzania…

Apparently there are some who felt so disgusted and fed-up that they detonated home-made bombs in the streets of Stone Town on the very day we visited:

www.nytimes.com/2015/11/02/world/africa/zanzibar-tanzania-bombings-elections.html?_r=0

As you must realize while reading this, we are safe and sound and en route to Italy. News of this magnitude deeply upsets us, not only because we were in extremely close proximity to these terrorist acts but also because it seems that hope may be lost. We leave Tanzania with heavy hearts but truly hope the best for this country and every person we encountered.

If we were keeping score, it’s now Nick and Tarin 2, and disastrous occurrences 0! We have now lived through a Typhoon in the Philippines and a terrorist attack in Tanzania.

Sleep Tight, Don’t let the Elephants Bite

It’s 12am and I am fast asleep in our luxury tent sitting high atop the Terengire valley. The ever-increasing strength of Tarin’s grip on my hand wakes me to a cacophony of animals just outside our canvas tent. I quickly sit up and realize that whatever is making the sound, it’s LARGE and it’s no more than 18 inches from where our heads had just laid. We sit on the bed, hands held tightly, and prepare for the worst; I reach for the aluminum extendo-pole for our GoPro, anticipating that I may have to fend something off. We hear the beast ripping off foliage and chewing, all while a constant “thwack, thwack, thwack” against the canvas of our tent lets us know that it’s definitely on top of us and wouldn’t have much trouble dispatching our tent through the air. Suddenly, a deep and slow rumble from the beast’s throat echoes through the air. We spring from this near-certain death bed and decide that we should hide behind something a little more substantial. The rear of the tent is partially constructed from concrete, so we think we would be safer back there. Shuffling to and fro and convinced that this was it, we ride out a period of about 45 minutes when the animal seems to finally move on. We peer out of the tiny screen windows to find a small family of gazelle appear, almost on queue with the departure of the much larger animal we had just heard. This seems odd, we think – wasn’t there some sort of a snarling beast here only moments ago ready to kill anything nearby? We continued watching the gazelle, in pure amazement of these beautiful animals when in the blink of an eye, they disappear as fast as they had showed up. I continue to look through the window when I see an elephant trunk appear from the left, and grab a tree branch in search of food. It was then that I realized that terrifying collection of sounds which caused our panic was an elephant! The longer we watched, the more elephants we saw. At this point, our fear dissipated and turned to pure wonderment at this rather peaceful looking family of elephants. They exercised their muscle power to snap off tree limbs to feed themselves and eventually moved on. By this time, it’s nearly 3am and we crawl back in to bed in order to catch a couple more hours of sleep. We poked our heads out of the tent at sunrise and waited for our required escort (a man quite a bit smaller than I with a flashlight – watch out one-ton elephants!!!) and make our way to the main lodge to find our safari guide, Mosses, waiting for us. We tell him of our incredible experience and he assures us that we were safe. He then follows this period of reassurance with a real fit of laughter. “Bwahaha…Mzungnu!” he exclaims. He and another guide continue to laugh for a period of several minutes and all we can do is smile and laugh along. Welcome to the safari mzungus (white people).

Our safari was nothing short of amazing. We managed to see nearly all of the big five: elephant, lion, hippo, cape buffalo and the black rhino (never did get to see the rhino!). They are categorized as the “big five” not only because of their large size, but also because of their strong ability to defend themselves and their family members. We witnessed gaggles of  grant gazelle, tons of tiny thompsons, lots of lions, zillions of zebras and enumerable elephants, among others (we’ll have plenty more where that came when we get home)!

Perhaps most special were our sightings of the normally shy and elusive cheetah and leopard. It was my birthday morning when we spotted our first cheetah walking along the road seemingly careless to our presence. We continued to follow the cheetah for several minutes when our guide told us that this was an animal on the hunt; not more than two minutes later, the cheetah bolted on a pack of small Thompson gazelles and disappeared over the horizon – all tail and elbows. Later that day, we were bouncing along the dusty road when we noticed a collection of other safari vehicles huddled around a group of acacia trees. We stopped and peered through the binoculars to find a well-muscled male leopard sunning himself on the large branch of an acacia. Not more than a few minutes later a family of unknowing warthogs came just a little too close to this opportunistic cat and we watched as the leopard leapt from the tree and scooped up a days-old warthog! He brought his prize back to the tree and devoured the snack just out of sight, behind the tree from which he was slumbering. We finished the day back at camp where Tarin had organized a small celebration of sorts with the camp staff. I had already enjoyed a few Safari lagers and had no problem joining in with the staff as they sang and danced as their way of saying “Happy Birthday”. *Pictures to come*

The following day, we witnessed something that Tarin and I both agree was the most special part of our trip. We were headed down a well traveled dirt road when a leopard stepped out of the long grass to show itself. As it continued directly in our path, our guide informed us that this was a female. While she sauntered along, she would occasionally let out a deep and short growl – this, we were told, was her call to her young. We followed her for quite a few minutes but eventually lost sight as she stepped back into the camouflage of the grass. Our guide didn’t waste a moment, and pealed out towards the opposite end of the field which the female leopard had disappeared. We continued along this stretch of grass for 10-15 minutes when I shouted to Mosses – “there she is”! We noticed the mother first and not more than a few steps behind her was one of her young she had found in the grass.

                                                        

Mama and Baby 1

She continued along, still calling out. Just beyond a line of acacia, another baby appeared and all three were reunited. They played and rubbed against one another, clearly happy to be in each other’s company. We didn’t get a chance to watch much longer as they quickly made their way out of sight.

We woke before sunrise every day and were treated quite well by all our hosts. Coffee, yogurt, bananas and eggs were made available every day before we would head off into the plains. All said and done, we visited Terengire National Park, Serengeti National Park, and the Ngorogoro Crater Preservation spread out over five days. It was truly an amazing experience, one that we are grateful to have included in our honeymoon adventure.

Monkeying Around

We departed the protected cove of our resort on Miniloc Island, each paddling our own kayaks. As we made our way out of the cove, we caught a glimpse of “Hiwa”, the resident three-flippered Hawksbill Sea Turtle.

Making quick time, we rounded two massive limestone cliffsides jutting out over the Philippine Sea to find throngs of tourists all hoping to catch a glimpse of the “Big Lagoon” on Miniloc. As the tides were quite low, most people were walking into the lagoon through the knee-high, crystal clear waters. Continuing forward we were greeted by an empty lagoon; the absence of boats and people milling about brought forward the sounds of the rainforest – teeming with birds and a rather mysterious jostling of tree branches. Just as Tarin started to say how badly she wanted to see the indigenous Long-Tailed Macaque monkey, I spotted one fishing at the edge of a limestone rock not more than a stones throw. We slowed our kayaks to get a better view when we realized that the tree branches moving about were Mr. Macaque’s buddies, munching on ripe fruits aplenty. The longer we observed, the greater the number we saw. Mom’s carrying their little ones, adolescents playing with one another and a watchful male (I am sure you can imagine how we decided we was a male) keeping eyes on us at all times. We estimated that this group was 20 strong. They never appeared too concerned about us floating along, all the while ooing and ahhing at a sight we had never witnessed.

We kept our distance so as not to disrupt their afternoon foraging but not without shooting some video. No recorded media can do this experience justice but we hope some of the serenity and beauty of this place is palpable.

Sweat, Mangos and Bottled Water

Local Spring Pools in Carmen, Crazy Picturesque
Local Spring Pools in Carmen, Crazy Picturesque
Oslob, Cebu with Bayani and Josephine
Oslob, Cebu with Bayani and Josephine

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We Swear There is a Red Carpet Under our Feet
We Swear There is a Red Carpet Under our Feet

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Toes in the Sand...err Coral
Toes in the Sand…err Coral

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We have had the pleasure of visiting the Philippines for the last 10 days and we couldn’t be any happier that we came to this island paradise. We started our journey by visiting the Island of Cebu and spent most of our time in my colleague’s home town of Carmen.  It seems as though the island never sleeps, there is constant chaos on the road and its difficult to imagine making a life here.To drive though shanty towns next to massive shopping malls was rather disheartening. It was difficult for us to realize and grasp the third world reality.

We thoroughly enjoyed our ‘family’ time in Carmen and couldn’t believe how many people came through to meet Rizza’s friends (us!). The home cooked Filipino food is to die for! We both agree it has been the best meal we have had the whole time while in the Philippines. Our last day with the family was spent driving 4 hours (in each direction), starting at 3 am to head south for swimming with whale sharks. Yes, you read that correctly, one of the oldest known and largest fish species on planey earth. I was, of course, nervous about the whole thing but they really are peaceful creatures who are not concerned with anything but the food coming from the boats. Our GoPro wasn’t working properly, so if you want to know what it’s like, YouTube “Whale Shark Swimming in Oslob, Cebu”. It was incredible. They were massive and made us realize how small and insignificant we humans are.

Our next island destination was our first ‘honeymoon’ spot – Miniloc Island. Imagine those images of thatch-roofed water cottages against limestone rocks with the jungle draping over, this is where we were for seven nights. It was only supposed to be five nights, but when a natural disaster occurs (Typhoon Kuppo) and the Coast Guard won’t allow boats to make mainland transfers you learn to accept paradise for an additional 2 full days and nights. Can you really be bummed? The weather wasn’t superb here, but the heat and humidity has been without fail. So, to ‘lay out’ in the sun didn’t need to occur in order to sweat and constantly feel the need to be in the water snorkeling the reef right off the dock. We certainly chose the right day for our island hop and picnic lunch on another island – since that day, all boats have been docked due to high surf.

We have had the chance to kayak, snorkel and play plenty of cards and dice enjoying our sea-view room. For the record, T kicked Nick’s butt in all but one hand of cards! There were plenty of naps on the white sand beaches and ample opportunity to drink the bar out of their local beers as it poured rain. We can look back and say we survived a Typhoon, in the classiest manner! We have been treated so well here, and have enjoyed our ‘honeymoon resort’ part of this trip, probably too much! Thankfully, we keep pinching each other and realizing how spoiled we treated ourselves.

Due to our extension, we did have to shorten our time in Moshi, Tanzania; and we are still hopeful that we will get off the Island and head out of Manila to catch our Safari on time. We will be meandering about the Serengeti during Nick’s 30th Birthday (Oct. 27th, for those who don’t know), so please send him lots of love for the dirty thirty! We will get that once we return to wi-fi, which may not be until we leave Africa.

Love, Nicholas and Tarin!

Bidu Kudasai!

Lying here on my ultra thin “bed” placed on the tatami mat of our Ryokan… in a bit of a beer-induced haze from last night…

Another amazing night in Japan, this time filled with traditional performance arts (including Geisha) and modern brews. We spent the evening in the Gion district, famous for it’s centuries old buildings and regular Geisha sightings. We will post some pics soon!

For all you beer lovers out there reading this, craft brews have hit Japan and you MUST come try. I filled my belly with a delicious IPA and T had a caramel-filled amber ale. Japan is in love with their dry, crisp lagers (Asahi, Sopporo, etc) which are definitely easy to drink…but there had to be something else to try in this land of refinement, right? Just ask your Ryokan staff for a recommendation and, voilà! True to form, we had good service, oishi food and a unique setting.

Japan so far…!

As we round out our time in the Japanese Alps, we have visited several neighborhoods, shrines, temples and markets throughout Tokyo and the Hida prefectures. And, we are in love! To think that this was a dream location for Nick and a place I would have never thought to go, it’s incredible to realize how much I know about this culture and how many things I love now having visited. Nick has been like a little kid in a candy store, finding himself often speechless. One, by the travel and the fact that we are living out a dream, but two, that we are in Japan, a place he has dreamt about since he was a young boy. I find pure joy in being by his side, living out his dream. Of course, I am taking the reins with the camera, with some slight nudges from my husband. It’s been a lot of fun getting back into my hobby, and the surroundings we have put ourselves in is a true dream. It’s just now starting to fall into Autumn here, although its been rather hot, both Nick and I have red cheeks today after our bike riding! But, the leaves have really started to change here in Takayama and goodness, do we both love Autumn. It’s very special to realize that we chose our perfect season for our wedding and for this travel.

Some of the more interesting things we have found in our week here in Japan is that its rather family oriented. They just dote over their little ones, and us newlyweds can’t get enough of the little munchkins. We have seen both moms and dads taking the kids to school in the morning and the whole family unit out in parks enjoying each others company.

The notion that one should be nervous to come to such a foreign place has been erased for us – all of the transit stations are in Japanese and English and they have information stations everywhere, with English speaking employees. There is a lot of hand gesturing and pointing at maps, but overall we get the point across. We bow our heads and say thanks (arigato!) more than once.

Another part of the Japanese culture that may be unknown is their genuine friendliness. Most smile as you walk by (with a bow of the head too) and will give a salutation as well. They will go out of their way to assist. We couldn’t find the ramen joint in our Tokyo neighborhood so we asked a local shopkeep – to our surprise, he walked us to the door of the restaurant which was at least 300 feet from his shop! It was crazy.

We are also surprised at how quiet Tokyo was, being such a large metropolitan. Our neighborhood was bustling in the morning, but you could hardly hear anything whether in your room or even on the streets (save the occasional loud truck or motorcycle). Without exaggerating, we heard ONE car horn honk in our three days in Tokyo! When we compare to our home in Newark CA, it’s astounding. There are also a lot of signs on the metro reminding passengers to refrain from talking on the phone. Nick and I paid close attention to the Japanese riders and noticed that we should be darn near whispering most of the time but were still able to hear one another clearly. Certainly a different manner of carrying one’s self than we are used to.

Have you ever used the NYC metro? Ever realized how nasty is it? Well, come over to this side of the Pacific and you will be amazed – the subway, the streets, everything is spotless. They wash the sidewalks and entrances of buildings every morning. Before our countryside bike tour yesterday we saw a group of bankers outside cleaning the sidewalks together before the opening of business. Their attention to detail is really something to take into consideration.

One of the biggest interests in our travel around this world is to discover the food we love in the places they originate and try food we have never encountered. Japan is certainly showing us some new flavors and preparation methods while also showing us their refinement. It’s been quite a shock to our palette. We’ve found it’s hard to finish a whole meal because the flavors are so new and rich.  Oishi! (yummy, tasty). We have had some incredible sushi and have learned the traditional way for eating this beloved food. Thankfully, it’s your choice here to use chopsticks or your hands with a piece of sushi, so if the little sticks aren’t cooperating put them down and dig in!

The big city of Tokyo enjoys it’s fashion. Nick and I love to people watch and we have seem some great outfits. Specifically, both men and women have unique shoes. We have seen every sort of style, both some we would want and others… not so much. Keep in mind, they remove their shoes before entering any dwelling, so the fancy shoes everyone wears is only for the world to see! It’s been a lot of fun experiencing the culture embracing such individuality.

We have been tracking our walking mileage with a pedometer in our backpack and spent the last two days on bikes. So far, in this last week we have walked a shade over 25 miles and riden approximately 12 miles on bikes 🙂 No rest for the weary, although this jet lag has been very hard, although I think we are both finally over the hump!

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Our Room in Tokyo
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Our Room in Takayama
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Hida Folk Village “Say: We Look Stupid… Err, Cheese!”
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Foot Bath? Yes, Please!
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The Beautiful Bride Alongside the Miyagawa River, Takayama
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Nick Angry! Nick Smash!
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Rainier Coffee!!!
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Wash Those Dirty Lil Paws!
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For Hailey 🙂 They are All Over!
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Fairlady Z!!! Lots of Skylines also
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Just, Eww! Eww.

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Love, T and N